FOOD (Was: Making sourdough bread... of all types.)

Discussion in 'TMT - Public' started by Mycroft Jones, Sep 6, 2016.

  1. Mycroft Jones

    Mycroft Jones The TM/FM Station Baron

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    So far I have mastered the making of sourdough rye bread, and sourdough barley bread.

    Tonight, I started the scientific process of developing an oat bread recipe.

    Rye, barley and oats have this in common: low in gluten. Very low. Making bread with them is extremely different from making wheat bread.

    So, I took the rye bread recipe and applied it to oats. I'll put the bread in the oven tomorrow. The sourdough process works best with 12 or more hours of rising time.

    So far, none of my breads have tasted sour. They've been quite mild and neutral in the acidity department.

    I grind my own flour. This ensures there is no enrichments, preservatives, or stabilizers in the flour. Just pure, 100% whole grain flour.

    I am posting tonight, because I am shocked. The oat bread dough is really different. It tastes like cookie dough. With peanut butter in it. I guarantee there are no peanuts in it. Oats are wild... It took me a long time to master Rye. Oats might need an equal amount of time. They are really their own thing. Each grain has a distinctive character.
     
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  2. Mycroft Jones

    Mycroft Jones The TM/FM Station Baron

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    Last night, I started a new type of bread: Volcano bread. I don't have a volcano handy, so I am cooking it with steam in a pressure cooker. Same effect. I have to plug the Instant Pot pressure cooker here; it should be in every man's kitchen. I set the timer and the cook time, and went to bed. This gave the dough time to rise, then it steam cooked the bread.

    The bread was soft, moist, and chewy. Now I'm trying a second batch, with tweaked parameters. When done right, the bread should shrink away from the walls of the bread pan as it cooks. This didn't happen.

    This is the inspiration for the experiment:



    The beauty of baking ‘volcano bread’ underground in Iceland | http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/how-they-bake-volcano-bread-underground-iceland.html
     
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  3. Mycroft Jones

    Mycroft Jones The TM/FM Station Baron

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    Update: volcano bread still isn't perfect, but is much better.

    What I did differently:

    I reduced the amount of water in the recipe.
    I let the bread cool completely before removing it from the tin.

    What is still wrong:

    The loaf collapsed. Possibly because I opened and released the steam 7 minutes into the process.

    What is better:

    I turned the tin can upside down, and with some gentle shaking the loaf came out on its own. Visually, it looked like the loaf would be stuck in the tin. But it wasn't. And I didn't have to use any oil to act as mold release for the tin; the bread just slid right out.

    Lesson learned:

    Make sure there is a tiny shim under the tin can, so that the steam can escape from underneath. Otherwise it screws with the pressure sensor, and the Instant Pot will keep venting the steam. That is why I opened the pressure cooker 7 minutes in.

    Also, don't open the pressure cooker. Do the cooking all in one go. 40 minutes is probably enough, but I put it on for 90 minutes. Even more wouldn't hurt anything.

    Also, let the loaf completely cool before removing it.
     
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  4. Lorien

    Lorien Active Member Typed

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    Do you have any pointers on how to make a good starter culture?

    My experiment with making a rye starter kind of failed. I somehow managed to produce a starter with a rich, fruity aroma, which I assume is what I'm going for. But I couldn't keep it. Within two days it turned very sharp and sour. Didn't get a chance to try baking with the fruity stage.
     
  5. Mycroft Jones

    Mycroft Jones The TM/FM Station Baron

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    I think sharp and sour is the correct stage. Once you bake it, the sharpness and sourness disappear. If you use unenriched 100% rye flour, your odds of getting a good sourdough culture are maximized. Rye is naturally acidic, which helps.
     
  6. Lorien

    Lorien Active Member Typed

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    Guess I'm just bad at baking then, because the resulting bread did not taste good.
     
  7. Mycroft Jones

    Mycroft Jones The TM/FM Station Baron

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    It took me quite a few tries to get a decent bread. Stick with it.
     
  8. Mycroft Jones

    Mycroft Jones The TM/FM Station Baron

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    I mastered sourdough rye bread and have now started on sourdough wheat bread. The rye method is also working out well for wheat, to my surprise. The wheat bread recipes don't work for rye. Glad I focused on rye first; wheat is easy by comparison. Also wheat bread is tastier (a little bit) and much easier to slice; it doesn't stick to the bread knife and make it all gummy.
     
  9. Mycroft Jones

    Mycroft Jones The TM/FM Station Baron

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    Update on the oat bread: never did master it. Might return to it when I have another go at making Ezekiel bread.

    Beans: while in Mexico I learned that a) they don't soak beans before cooking them. Just eat your beans and within 3 days the farting will stop. And b) the best way to eat them is to put them in a blender and make them into a smoothie. Who needs whey protein shakes when you can drink delicious bean? Might look and sound bad, but it is amazingly tasty, full of umami flavor. I can't recommend cooking beans and running them through the blender enough. With a little salt and pepper to taste. Amazing, very filling, very healthy and nutritious. And you add the bean sauce to almost anything. Spread it on bread. Add it to a soup. Add it to a stew. Put it on your pasta as a pasta sauce. Of course, bean dip for potato chips and nachos. I find if I mix it with black olives it is super tasty.

    If you have beans and sourdough bread every day, you could survive a good long time before vitamin B12 deficiency sends you off to raid the henhouse for eggs and pester the cows for milk. Something to keep in mind for those of you building fallout shelters.
     
  10. Mycroft Jones

    Mycroft Jones The TM/FM Station Baron

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    Beef liverwurst. As per Leviticus, I don't eat animal fat beyond what is unreasonably hard to remove from the meat. Lately I've been craving the liverwurst of my youth. This is probably evidence of a mineral deficiency. Liver is one of the most amazing foods for minerals and B vitamins.

    But all liverwurst in North America is made from pork, unlike Germany where some cow liverwurst is also made. Secondarily, liverwurst like many sausages, has a large percentage of tallow (fat) added. This would not do. I needed to find a fat substitute.

    So I found a maker of sausage who was willing to make beef liverwurst. Many sausage makers flat out refused. Even this one was reluctant. He tried to dissuade me for a long time.

    At one store there was a product called "Liver Paste" from New Zealand. It was delicious. It was made 100% from beef. But... it had a lot of tallow added. If only they could use something other than tallow. I thought and thought. What type of dietary fat is not from animal source, but has the good properties of animal fat? Saturated fat, with a high melting point? Palm oil. Humans have been eating palm oil for hundreds if not thousands of years, and in good health as a result.

    This week I picked up 10 pounds of beef liverwurst. It was the sausagemakers first attempt, so it wasn't as good as what I remembered, but it was good enough. I got home and spread it on some sourdough wheat bread, then covered it with mustard. Oh my. Delicious. That is what I was missing. Now I can get my missing minerals and vitamins without the disgusting taste of regular liver and without breaking Jehovah's laws about pork and fat.

    After years of searching... then I decide to investigate the kosher Ashkenazi dish, "chopped liver". Goddamit, almost identical to liverwurst. But they add in chicken fat (schmaltz).

    Anyway, liver is great for making sure you don't get copper deficiency among other minerals.

    PS: If I'd known about haggis I might not have bothered with the beef liverwurst. Haggis is an amazing mild and delicious dish, with many of the benefits of beef liver. And the sausagemaker had made a batch exclusively with lamb.
     

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